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Full text of "Annual report of the Division of Immigration and Americanization"

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COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Board of Higher Education 




Division of Immigration and Americanization 



FIFTY ■ FIRST 



ANNUAL REPORT 



July 1, 1967-June 30, 1968 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
THE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 



Winthrop S. Dakin, Chairman 
Amherst, Mass. 

Bernard J. O'Keefe, Vice Chairman 
Natick, Mass. 



Dr. Gene P. Grille- 
Louis M. Lyons 
Patrick J. King 
Roger L. Futnam, Sr. 
Daniel C. Rich 
Margaret Spengler 
Frieda S. Ullian 
Esther S. Yntema 
James T. Curtis 
Dr. Arthur Fitzgerald 



- Bradford, Mass. 

- Cambridge, Mass. 

- Brighton, Mass. 

- Petersham, Mass. 
-Worcester, Mass. 

- Arlington, Mass. 

- Newton Center, Mass 

- Cambridge, Mass. 

- Lowell, Mass. 

- Lexington, Mass. 



Dr. Richard M. Millard, Chancellor 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 



MAIN OFFICE 



BOSTON, MASS. 



BRANCH OFFICES 



FALL RIVER, MASS, 



LAWRENCE, MASS. 



Room 208, Tremont Building 
73 Tremont Street 
Telephone: 227-0718 
Supervisor of Social Service 
Teofilia K. Tattan 



51 Franklin Street 

Telephone: OSborne 2-7762 
District Immigration Agent 
Daniel J. Donahue 

Room 308-9 Blakeley Building 
kll Essex Street 
Telephone: MUrdock 2-2877 
District Immigration Agent 

Andrew W. Ansara 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



WORCESTER, MASS. 



State Office Building 
235 Chestnut Street 
Telephone: REpublic It-1018 
District Immigration Agent 
John a. Mclnnes 

Room 1|01-1±02, Park Building 
507 Main Street 
Telephone: PLeasant 5-6615 
District Immigration Agent 
Edmund B. Meduski 



Publication?^ 70 Approved by Alfred C. Holland - State Purchasing Agent 



". -- "■ ■-"--■ * ■ - — ,- 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 






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http://archive.org/details/annualreportofdi1968mass 






REPORT OF THE 
DIVISION OF MIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

FOR THE YEAR 

JULY 1, 1967 TO JUNE 30, 1968 



This summary will be the fifty-first report submitted by 
this Division since it was established as the Bureau of Immigration 
in 1917. From 1919 to 1965, as the Division of Immigration and 
Americanization, it was under the Department of Education, With 
the enactment of Chapter 572 in 1965, the Board of Higher Education 
was given jurisdiction of this Division and its functions have been 
the same - "bringing into sympathetic and mutually helpful relations 
the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign origin". 

Massachusetts with its increased population now of 5»^ million 
ranks tenth among the States. It is seventh with number of aliens 
and records at forty per cent its population of foreign origin. 
(The Bureau of Census defines foreign origin either those born 
abroad or those who have parents foreign born.) Boston is rated 
as a city with fifty per cent population of persons with foreign 
background, with its large foreign born population and those having 
foreign born parents and also because of the large number of foreign 
students studying at its many educational institutions. 

OUR SERVICES 



The charts at the end of this report detail the 1*7,297 
services given by the five offices of this Division in the many 
problems of assimilation, reuniting families, citizenship assistance, 
as well as the many phases of immigration problem assistance given 
to some 19,000 individuals this year. A notable increase is noted 
for Boston - 2,578 more than last year. Services recorded are: 
Boston, 26,562] Fall River, U,171] Lawrence, 7,021] Springfield, 3,937. 
and Worcester, 5,606. 

NATIONALITIES OF CLIENTS 



Of the some one hundred eight countries of birth, as we record 
nationalities . of the applicants, services were given Italian born, 
5,382 (3,196 in Boston) 1 Portuguese (includes Cape Verde Islands) 
U,625 (of which Fall River had 2,825) | Canada 14,121] Cuba, 3,938] 
United States born, 3,513] Greece, 2,903] Poland, 2,1*72] Ireland, 
1,635] Jamaica, 1,371] German, 1,306] and China, 1,077 with others 
less than 1,000 and showing increases in numbers, especially in 
countries of Latin America and from the West Indies. 



ALIENS IN MASSACHUSETTS 









• 



The Federal annual registry of aliens for January 1°68 
shows 3,876,301*. aliens registering as required with 1*71,127 
of these other than permanent residents of the United States, 
With increase of population since I960 census, Massachusetts , 
tenth in population count, is seventh with its ll*9, 651* aliens 
and shows an increase of 5,000 over the number of last year ! s 
registrants. The list of States with the largest number of 
aliens for 1968: 

Other than 
Permanent Permanent 
1968 Residents Residents 



California 


923,11*5 


858,671* 


61*, 1*71 


New York 


708,823 


629,01*2 


79,781 


Illinois 


252,516 


225,021 


27,521* 


Texas 


2l*2,02l* 


230, 9h6 


11,078 


Florida 


2l*l,08l 


11*9,810 


91,271 


New Jersey 


208,222 


175,11*3 


33,077 


Massachusettsll*9,651* 


136,632 


13,C02 


Michigan 


114;, 2 72 


132,1*82 


3,853 


Pennsylvania 


• 10U,7i4l 


93,387 


11,351* 




FROM WHENCE THEY COME 








This year for the first time, in the foreign speaking 
group, those from Portugal, recorded at 22,579, form the 
largest group, showing an increase of some 1*,000 over last year 
and attesting to the benefits of the Immigration Act permitting 
reunion of families ; Italians next largest with ll*,922 recorded, 
about 1,000 more than last year. The following chart records 
countries of birth of the 136,632 permanent resident aliens 
in Massachusetts: 

TOTAL ALIENS 136,632 
Europe 85, 88l 



Albania 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg 






561 
288 

1*1 

1U7 

258 

28 

872 

1,382 

1*,602 

5,026 

333 

5,U66 

11*, 922 

575 

1,89U 

11 






. 






Netherlands 1,273 

Norway '— - 526 

Poland • 7,850 

Portugal 22,579 

Rumania 150 

Spain 318 

Sweden 81*9 

Switzerland i|01 
Turkey .' .627 

United Kingdom 12,711 

U. S. S. R. i,5oo 

Yugoslavia 175 

Other Europe ... ' kh 

Asi a __ 6,091 

China - 2,900 

India Ut9 

Indonesia 32 

Iran 156 

Iraq 32 

Israel 388 

Japan 521 

Jordan 112 

Korea 286 

Lebanon SSS 

Pakistan kO 

Palestine 11 

Philippines 35^ 

Other Asia 353 



North America 39,0U6 

Canada " 33,673 

Mexico 253 

Barbados 169 

Cuba 2,259 

Dominican Republic 327 

Haiti 371 

Jamaica 625 

Trinidad & Tobago 1U6 

Costa Rica 316 

El Salvador 1;0 

Guatemala 196 

Honduras 388 

Nicaragua 28 

Panama 255 






South America 




2,981 


Argentina 
Brazil 
Chile 
Colombia 
Ecuador 
Peru 

Venezuela 
Other South America 

Africa 


602 
768 
108 
770 
201; 
195 
176 
158 


507 


Morocco 
South Africa 
Tunisia 


17 

159 

12 




U, A. R. (Egypt) 
Other Africa 

Oceania 


238 
81 


399 


Australia 
New Zealand 
Other Oceania 

3 

Stateless 


306 
3* 


867 


All Other 




860 


RECENT ARRIVALS 







In the past ten years 126,61+7 immigrants gave Massachusetts 
as their destination. The latest official federal report 
completed as of June 30, 1967 records that 18,21*6 came to 
Massachusetts in that year. NQ official record is yet 
available for 1968 but that figure will be exceeded for 
1968, I believe. The report of their countries of birth 
for 1967 is j 



Italy 


1,807 


United Kingdom 


1,708 


Canada 


1,553 


Greece 


1,29U 


China 


697 


Cuba 


562 


Germany 


U32 


Poland 


291 



Denmark, Norway & Sweden 
France 


225 
126 


Colombia 


10U 


Philippines 

Japan 

Haiti 


102 
92 
78 


Dominican Republic 

Ecuador, Mexico & Yugoslavia 

All Other 


51 
U6 
8,936 etc. 



We note from the alien registration the large Portuguese 
group but apparently this report groups the Portuguese in 
the "All Other" category. From the records, showing new 
arrivals, which we receive from the Federal office to 
circularize for educational opportunities, it is interesting 
to note what persons of various nationalities give as their 
destination, tending to go to cities where live large groups 
of the same ethnic background. Most of the Portuguese go 
to New Bedford] Italians in large numbers to the North 
End of Boston; a great number of West Indian domestics 
destined to Suburbia. At least twenty-five per cent change 
their address within months of arrival, as attested by 
return of welcome letters we send all immigrants. 

PROBLEMS OF THE NEWCOMER 



We send a letter to the newly arrived immigrant, 
offering the services of our offices • The replies come 
with requests for information on educational opportunities, 
especially learning English. Many inquire about accelerated 
courses for English, as well as evening courses in trades 
and technical subjects. Translations of diplomas and 
school credits, job opportunities, drivers 1 licenses, 
addresses to register for the draft, as well as the change 
of address forms AR-11, non-receipt of alien registration 
cards, information on immigration, reunion with relatives 
left abroad, or when citizenship may be obtained are 
usual inquiries. 

Three thousand sixty newcomers received assistance 
last year. Many of the Portuguese immigrants were married 
men vjho came alone, finally getting their visas after 
a long wait in the quota. Many had families left behind 
and it has not been unusual to make as many as eight 
petitions for one applicant. Often a close relative 
assists this new immigrant in joining as sponsor by 
making the additional affidavit of support. 

Many neitfly arrived Italian parents of a citizen 
child in the United States leave behind unmarried adult 
sons and daughters. They come to the office a week 
after arrival into the United States to initiate action 
in making the necessary petitions. 



IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS 


Information on bringing friends and relatives and on procedures 
is asked many times. Cur services cover answering questions on the 
quota to writing appeals to the Board of Immigration Appeals on 
changes of status applications perhaps. Since enactment of the 
Immigration Law of October 1965 regarding need of labor clearances, 
many an aunt desiring to "sponsor" her niece in Iteland with an 
affidavit of support has been disappointed at the requirement for 
promise of a job and the necessary approval of the Labor Department, 
We gave information and forms for employers to fill. Domestic 
applications lessened when, in the latter part of the year, the 
higher wage scale was required. Many of the relatives having 
abroad cousins or uncles, etc., for whom no relative petitions 
could be made, assisted their relatives by getting employers who 
could employ such skilled labor to make the necessary assurances 
of employment. We have assisted many in translation of education 
evidence and of work experience to accompany applications sent 
for approval to the Federal authorities. Many x^rere applications 
for tailors, stone masons, mechanics, etc., where a shortage of 
such labor had been established. 

Petitions to create immediate family relationship are still 
most numerous and our report shows that 1,338 such petitions 
were made. At first, a sister, brother, or spouse of a person in 
Ireland or Great Britain had to be convinced that a petition was 
required with the necessary personal documentation to prove 
relationship, followed by the affidavit of support, etc. The 
newly arrived immigrant parent itfith an unmarried child abroad is 
usually quick to start procedure and often brings with him the 
necessary documents on his initial appearance at the office. 
Many of the brothers and sisters in Portugal, Greece, China, 
Lebanon, etc., having waited long for their turns in the quota, 
now were able to get their turns and come to the United States • 
We assisted many of the "domestics" arriving from the West Indies 
in making necessary papers to be reunited with their husbands 
and children. 

CHANGE OF STATUS 



Eight hundred thirty-one persons were assisted in completing 
their applications for permanent residence. Many were from 
Central America, South America, and the Dominican Republic. They 
had come to the United States as visitors and had married citizens 
of the United States. Anxious to remain here, they could not 
adjust under Section 2U5 by application at the Federal Office 
and remaining in the United States, but American Consuls in nearby 
Canada could process their applications now that they were spouses 
of United States citizens. The necessary forms and procedures 
were completed and, although it took a number of months and anxious 
T^aiting by the spouse, appointments were arranged and the trip to 
Canada meant a one-day stay and return as a resident of the United 
States. Several of these change of status cases involved young 



men desiring to enter the armed services of the United States, 
Tiro South American, a West Indian," and two- 1 Canadian young' men, 
also one Canadian born girl, visitors in the United States, 
procured such evidence of acceptance into military service 
and the Consul accepted this in lieu of a labor clearance. 
Applications were processed and, since the persons were from 
nonquota countries, appointments for issuance of visas were 
arranged expeditiously. 

Others were immediate relative visitors in this country who 
had decided to try to stay in the United States — as a parent of 
a citizen ora sister or brother from a country where approval of 
the petition made available the quota number. The necessary 
forms, translations, if so required, were executed and applications 
filed with the Federal Service. Our bilingual social workers 
accompanied many of the applicants to hearings in their behalf. 
We represented clients in 220 such cases. 

There is no doubt that labor clearance requirements 
made it more difficult to get visas for the nonquota country 
applicants and for those from countries where nonpreference 
numbers had been available. . Under the previous law, about 
seventy per cent of the nonpreference numbers were available 
for the people of Great Britain, Ireland, and Germany. There 
have been protest bills introduced in behalf of persons of 
these nationalities, as wsll as other laws introduced by 
many senators and congressmen to make changes in the legislation. 
Some recommend preferences in quota for parents of aliens j others 
would make quota numbers available to brothers and sisters of 
Italian birth who still await their turns in the quota after 
twelve years) as- well as suggested changes in labor clearance 
requirements • 

On July 1, 1968 when the ceiling of 120.000 for the Western 
Hemisphere becomes effective, it is predicted that for many of 
our applicants with Canadian relatives, spouses of legal 
resident Jamaicans or other nationals of the Western Hemisphere, 
there will be a waiting list for their turn in the quota. 

CUBANS 
The many Cubans in this Commonwealth we continue to 
assist in applications for adjustment to residents, initiating 
1±38 such actions in 1°68. Our Spanish worker was kept very 
busy in translating the necessary birth, marriage, determination 
of marriage records to accompany the applications. The Cubans 
became aware of the impending July first legislation when it 
might be that they would be included in the 120,000 Western 
Hemisphere quota applicants and applicants in the months of 
April through June were more numerous. 

Many of the relatives continue to seek our assistance in 
making necessary letters, applications, and affidavits of 
support for their relatives to come to the United States via Mexico. 






Having become discouraged waiting for their relatives to come 
on the regular airlift via the Refugee Center in Miami, they are 
most anxious to try any procedure. Among those who have reached 
Mexico, even the requirement of a sister or brother coining to 
the United States for the labor clearance has been surmounted. 

A number of Cubans have applied for citizenship now that 
they had the necessary five years of permanent residence!!! 

CITIZENSHIP AND NATURALIZATION 



United States citizenship is a prized privilege, as attested 
by many inquiries regarding loss of citizenship by living abroad, 
as well as many newcomers' barely complying with the necessary 
five year requirement. ¥e assisted 1,783 persons in our 
offices in initiating their applications for naturalization. 
In this State last year, U>l66 persons were naturalized. With 
the conveniently available evening classes for English and 
Citizenship in this State, it has been an incentive for the 
newcomer to apply for citizenship as soon as possible after 
the necessary residence period, as he is better qualified. 

Cur booklet, "Questions and Answers in Preparation for 
Naturalization Examination" is given to each applicant we assist 
in filling the application. We print some 10,000 booklets 
yearly for distribution to public school classes, civic groups, etc. 

The requirement to present proof of citizenship derived 
through parentage or marriage necessitated assistance for 313 
persons in making applications for derivative citizenship. . 
For some of the applicants, it x>ras easy to get the necessary 
birth, marriage, and naturalization data required. In a few 
of the cases where citizenship was gained through a grandparent, 
it meant much correspondence and ferreting out old birth and 
residence records. Usually in an election year, the requirement 
for registration to vote has made it necessary, in many cases, 
to furnish such proof. 

Only one change in the naturalization laws was passed 
in 1968. This affects widows of servicemen x-7ho may be naturalized 
under eased regulations without the required period of 
residence. 

Legislation introduced for Vietnam War Veterans may be 
soon enacted but easing of requirements of complying with 
necessary examination, as for elderly persons, etc., has 
received no action. 






PENDING L EGISLATION 



. 






There are several bills pending, advocating changes in 
the immigration laws... some to make numbers in the quota 
available if petitions were approved prior to July 1, 1968j some 
to make numbers available for certain countries; another to help 

' , ■ 



those in skilled labor preferential quotas, as well as to grant 
nonquota standing to certain close relatives, etc. as usual, 
the bills are many and varied and predict further assistance 
we may be required to give our Massachusetts residents. 

COOPERATION 1 T ITH OTHER AGENCIES 

The Division has enjoyed constant cooperation of the _ 
district director of the U. S. Immigration and Naturalization 
Service. We have also had pleasantly cooperative relationships 
with the social agencies in Boston which engage in technical 
immigration and citizenship work. YJe have given consultative 
service to other social agencies on occasional problems concerning 
their clients of foreign origin. 



SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 



During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1968, 3,937 services 
were performed for 2,l6l individuals by the Springfield District 
0ffi.ce for residents of this area. 

Individuals came to us from fifty-one localities in the 
Commonwealth. In addition, we received correspondence from 
sixty-three former residents who now live in other parts ol 
the United States. 

Of the seventy-six nationalities recorded, natives of 
Canada were the largest group, followed in turn by natives of 
rfche United States, Jamaica, Italy, Germany, Greece, Poland, Great 
Britein, Ireland, and Portugal. 

During the year, we contacted by mail 7U6 newly arrived 
immigrants who came to reside in Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden and 
Hampshire Counties. Subsequently we heard from many of them, 
reporting changes of address, filing annual address reports, 
inquiring about registering for Selective Service and about 
possibility of sponsoring relatives who wish to come to this 
countrv. A small percentage of them employed as. domestics 
sought" oar assistance and guidance regarding problems that have 
arisen with their employers . 

Again this year, the major part of our work came under 
the classification of immigration. The need for labor clearance 
still creates insurmountable problems for some of our clients, 
especially when their relatives are unskilled. 

In connection with adjustment of status cases, we handled 
several for whom we were able to make the necessary arrangements 
to go to the American Consulate at Saint John, New Brunswick. 






Only one of these cases was unsuccessful and that was in reference 
to a young man born in Ecuador whose application was accepted but 
he was finally notified that the consul could no longer process 
the application because the American Consular Office in Ecuador 
requested that the young man be instructed to return there to 
make his formal application. It should be noted here that we 
have received prompt and full cooperation from the Consul at 
Saint John, Canada, as well as those whom we contact abroad. 

Another of our adjustment cases concerned a lady born in 
Haiti in 1927 xiiocame to the United States in 1935. When she 
first came to us, she stated that she was a citizen of the 
United States because her mother was born in the State of Florida. 
It later developed that her mother had not been born in the 
United States. When client attempted to apply for naturalization, 
it was discovered that she entered the United States illegally 
so, therefore, she was required to apply to have a record of her 
lawful entry created under Section 2U9 as amended. To further 
add to the problems of this individual, it was discovered that 
she had been married to an alien born in the Western Hemisphere 
who recently entered the United States illegally. We are now 
working on his case, trying to arrange for him to obtain an 
immigrant visa in Canada. 

Although applications for naturalization have decreased, 
preparation of an application is more time-consuming. Of the 
several applications handled for gentlemen born abroad and at 
present serving in the United States Air Force, there was one 
that was most rewarding j it concerned a veteran of the Vietnam 
conflict who recently returned to the United States. Another 
case of a Vietnam veteran concerned his desire to have his 
adopted children become citizens. They were both born in South 
Vietnam and viere adopted by him while he was serving there with 
the United States Air Force. 

Again this past year we corresponded with both the United 
States State Department and the United States Immigration and 
Naturalization Service in cases of adjustment of citizenship 
status of ladies who benefited by the United States Supreme Court 
Decision of Kay 29> 1967 in the case of Afroyim v. Rusk . 

While attending one of the final hearings for naturalization 
at our local court, this agent x^ras both surprised and honored when 
the presiding justice called his name and that of the United 
States Naturalization Examiner, instructing them both to rise and, 
in the presence of all, extended his thanks for their assistance 
to the court and to the new citizens. 

We continue to enjoy excellent contacts and cooperation from 
private and socal agencies in our area, city and town clerks, 
registrars of voters, clerks of courts and teachers in Adult 
Education, and particularly would express our appreciation to 
both the Springfield and Boston Offices of the United States Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service for their cooperation and 
assistance. 



WORCESTER OFFICE 

This District Office assisted 3,3U6 individuals with £,606 
services. This branch office of the Division, comprising an Agent 
and a Clerk, again had a substantial amount of services, due to 
the fact that Worcester County is the largest in area in Massa- 
chusetts, being bigger than Rhode Island and bordering three 
States. It measures about kO miles from side to side and 50 
miles from head to foot. It contains 60 cities and towns, each 
with its own government, its own history, its own characteristics 
in terms of geography, economy, and general way of life influenced 
by different nationality and ethnic groups derived from immigrants 
dating back to the Pilgrims to the ones of the present day. 
For example, the town of Hardwick was purchased from the Indians j 
the town common of Holden once belonged to John Hancock; and not 
that we would be facetious, George Washington really did sleep 
in Mendon. 

New immigrants who arrived during the year, sponsored by 
friends or relatives, are warmly welcomed by them and by the 
ethnic groups comprised of previous immigrants and first, second, 
and even third generation Americans predominating in these 
localities. Our office has also assisted and advised industry, 
business and affluent residents with forms and government 
procedure to obtain vitally needed personnel such as professional, 
technical, skilled, unskilled, and even domestic help from 
overseas, that cannot be obtained locally, and were so certified 
by the Massachusetts Division of Employment Security. A 
leisurely drive through the central part of the State, as one 
observes names, architecture, commercial enterprises, and ways 
of life, makes these facts evident. 

Incidentally, we assisted with citizenship the Turkish born 
wife of a Worcester man, under Section 319(b) of the law, as spouse 
of a United States citizen employed by a U. S. concern. He is a 
construction supervisor with a United States company that, with 
native help, is constructing schools, churches and other public 
buildings in countries overseas which never had these facilities, 
also by this, fostering the American way of life and ideals there. 

We also get involved with the increased travel boom and 
increased issuance of United States passports from the Clerk 
of Courts' Office, Worcester, to local residents. One man whom 
they advised on a derivative certificate before issuance of 
a passport phoned our office and still in an angry tone did not 
see the necessity of it because he is a citizen desiring to 
travel next month. After our discussing the matter with him, 
he became more agreeable, especially after our offering to 
complete the N-600 form, trying to expedite the matter, and 
advising on necessary documentation. 

Americanization is one phase of our work - the other, 
Immigration which has been more complex for the past few years 
due to beneficial changes in the quota system by Congress, and 
another revision being effective on July 1, 1°68 which we explain 



daily to our clients native to this locality and to others from 
many sections of the world. Regulations, forms, and procedure 
concerning seven preferences and nonpreference for quota numbers 
for the Eastern Hemisphere, and 120,000 annual limitation 
prescribed in Section 21(e) of the Act of October 3, 1965 for 
the Western Hemisphere may be cause for perplexity for persons 
not in this realm of endeavors. 

LAUREKCE OFFICE 



The number of persons served by the Lawrence District Office 
totalled 2,831 for the past fiscal year. Although the 7,021 
services and total persons served are less, somewhat, from last 
year's all-time high, it seems that this past year we were the 
busiest we have ever been. This can be attributed - in part - to 
the fact that many changes in the immigration laws necessitated 
our giving detailed explanations and interpretations of the 
new regulations. 

When the law was passed in 1965, we had high hopes that 
many families x-jere to be reunited. This was true for a while. 
Now, however, it seems that a bottleneck has developed and 
we are having to give many, many persons the disappointing news 
that it appears it x-jill be some time before their relatives 
will be able to come to this country. It is hoped that the next 
Congress will see fit to pass alleviating legislation, easing 
present resiErictions. 

Again, as in the past years, the bulk of our work dealt 
with immigration matters. Petitions, affidavits of support, 
and changes of status, especially for Cuban refugees, were high 
on the list of services rendered. In Lawrence, particularly, 
there has been a large influx of persons from the Dominican 
Republic. It is interesting to note how individuals from 
certain countries will select a particular community in which 
to settle. For example, there is now a large Dominican community 
in Lawrence. Lox^ell, practically a twin city of Lawrence, has 
a negligible number of Dominicans. These cities are very similar 
and less than ten miles apart. 

We had many routine cases requiring assistance. One of the 
unusual ones involved a man from a Communist country who came to 
the United States as a visitor. A highly skilled electronics 
technician, he was trained in his work by his government. During 
his stay in the United States, he received an excellent offer of 
a very responsible position with an electronics firm. We explained 
the procedure for a change of status and assisted both him and 
the employer in completing the necessary forms. The man was 
extremely well -qualified and all the papers were approved. 
Because, however, no visa number xtfas available for a person in 
this man's category, the U. S. Immigration and Naturalization 
Service x^as obliged to reject his application and gave him 
thirty days to leave the country. Meanwhile, the man received 



correspondence from relatives in his homeland informing him 
that, because he did not return when he should have, he is now 
considered a fugitive. He was tried "in absentia", found guilty, 
and sentenced to three years at hard labor. His relatives warned 
him that he would be arrested as soon as he set foot in his 
country. 

There being no other recourse, after interview of relatives 
and friends, a Congressman introduced a Private Bill in his 
behalf. The man, still in the United States, is contributing 
his expert knowledge to a vital facet of our electronics industry. 
The United States Immigration officials have assured they will 
give him every consideration as soon as a visa number becomes 
available for his use. 

We are particularly concerned with helping tnose many 
persons who wish to become naturalized. One hundred forty- 
three applicants were assisted in filling citizenship forms. 
This agent attends all the naturalization sessions in Lowell 
and Lawrence and makes special effort to congratulate each 
of the new citizens, many of whom he had helped to initiate 
the action. 

Additional services included making a number of 
translations of documents from French, German, Arabic, Latin, 
and Italian. We sent letters welcoming all newcomers to our 
area. We assisted both employers and prospective employees 
in completion of labor clearance applications. American citizens 
were assisted in completion of applications for United States 
passports. Newcomers having problems dealing with matters 
other than immigration or citizenship x^ere referred to the 
proper resources. 

The news media in Lox^ell and Lawrence were most cooperative 
in publicizing whatever news releases we gave them. We have 
continued to maintain cordial relations with public and 
private agencies both in this country and overseas to our 
mutual benefit. 

Althqugh many evenings we go home "dog-tired", our sense 
of accomplishment somehow lifts up our spirits and we feel that 
our efforts are worth while. 



FALL RIVER OFFICE 

'with the close of the fiscal year, June 30, 1968, the 
total statistical count remains fairly consistent at i;,171 
for the entire year and 2,U09 individuals were assisted in 
their problems. These figures do not r ecord other services 
rendered, such as telephone inquiries or the newcomer letters 
sent to all new immigrant arrivals in the Southeastern Massachusetts 
area. 



The Immigration Act of October 3 > 1965 has eased immigration 
barriers for the predominantly large Portuguese ethnic, group whose 
roots and ties are concentrated in this area. There have been 
thousands of newly arrived located in this area during the past 
fiscal year, so much so, that it required reopening of unused, old 
schools to take care of the children's needs. The new influx of immi- 
grants did not come about overnight. It has been the backlog of old 
visa petitions completed by members of the immediate families and a 
large portion of these visa petitions was completed at this office. 
Beneficiaries of these petitions are Slow entitled to bring their entire 
family units, hence the large influx of new immigrants gained by the 
unused quota pools which took effect October 3, 1965- This quota pool 
represents unused visas from countries having large quotas. They are 
placed in a pool and distributed to nations with small quotas and 
backlogs of intending immigrants awaiting their turn to enter the 
United States, This immigration will increase during the next fiscal 
year and numerous inquiries by the press and radio have been made 
regarding the magnitude of newcomers, so much so that many stories of 
interest have been written in local newspapers and in others 
throughout Southeastern Massachusetts, 

Regarding citizenship services at this Branch Office during the 
past fiscal year, the count is approximately consistent with that of 
the previous year • One hundred ninety-four petitions for naturalization 
were completed by persons applying in their own behalf and parents 
petitioning in behalf of minor children. Twenty-five persons applied 
for their own certificates of citizenship. Election year reminds those 
eligible to apply for United States citizenship and it is anticipated 
that the coming year will bring an increase in naturalization. 
This Branch Office has made numerous appeals to the Board of Review, 
Department of State, Washington, D, C, regarding Certificates of Loss 
of Nationality in behalf of native-born United States, citizens of 
Portuguese ancestry. In all cases, the clients Were born in the 
United States and taken to Portugal at a tender age. During World ¥ar 
II, the Portuguese Army inducted these United States citizens into the 
armed forces of Portugal whereby under the Immigration and Nationality 
Act of 19h0 they were considered to have lost U. S. nationality. Using 
the United States Supreme Court decision of . Nishikawa v, Dulles, this 
Agent was successful in assistance and the Department of State ruled 
that these clients did not lose the nationality of the United States, 

This Agent was one of the principal speakers at the Regional 
Conference of the Massachusetts Department of Education held at 
Falmouth, Massachusetts, December lU, 1967 9 fit which educators, 
clergy, and congressional staff members were also on the speakers ' list. 

This Branch Office also deals with public and private agencies 
throughout the District j with Federal Immigration and Naturalization 
Service and American Consuls of the Department of State ; and there 
has been a fine spirit of cooperatin between this office and the 
aforementioned agencies. 



For the Fiscal Year 7/1/67-6/30/68 



INFORMATION 



3 

o 

Eh 

o 



STA M ISTICAL 



Booklet^ Forms, Blanks 

Citizenship 

Immigr atio n 

Travel 

Other ' " ~" 



i Services 



5968 



FORMS FILLED 

Change of Address (AR-11) 
Consulate Biographic Form (DSP-70)~ 
Visa Registration (FS-U97 and U97AJ 

Imm. Visa Application (FS-510) 

Notice as Representative (G-28)~ 
Annual Address Report (1-53) 
Lost Alien Reg. Card (1-90) 



Visa Petition-Temp. Help (I-129B) 
Visa Petition-Close Relative (l-136T~ 

Reentry Permit (1-131) . 

Skilled Worker Petition (I-lU0) ~~ 
Permission Ret. to Domicile (1-191) 
Permit to Return aft. Deport. (1-2127 

Removal to Native Country (I-2U3) ' 

Suspension of Deportation (I-256A) 
Notice of Filing Brief (I -2 SOB) 
Foreign Police Clearance (l-li81i.)^ 



836 



271 



I5£? 



105 



191 



i7U8 
211; 



177 

160 



T5F 
"22T 



~2& 



3 



8U3 



182 



^ 

3 

fe 



en! 

> 
H 



DETAIL 



■ w 



Given 



1680 



k8l 



W 



1ST 



13 



32 



783 



13 



1 



1 
W 



TFT 



.20 



132 



11U 



1 
"5" 



Registry Form to make Record (I-U85) 
Perm. Residence Application (l-l±85) 
Change Status to Student (1-506) 



35 



10 



U36 



Extension of time for Visitor (1-539) 38H 
Legal Residence Information sent 

to Consuls (1-550) ^__^__ t ___ 
Petition under Orphans Act (1-600) 
Waiver of Excludability (1-601 
Waiver under Exchange Act ( 1-612) 
Other Immigration Forms 



Declaration of Intention (N-300) 
Petition for Naturalization (N-UOOj" 
Repatriation of American Born 
Citizen (N-U01) 



Petition for Nat'l of Child (N-U02) 
Certification of Military or Naval 

Service JN-1±26) 

Duplicate Nat'l Certificate (N-565)__ 
Proof of Citizenship for us 

Abroad (N-577) 

Verification of Arrival (N-585) 
Derivative Citizenship Cert. (N-600) 
Other Naturalization Forms 



318 

~2? 



13 



5 



38 



76 

T5TT 



7 

1 



38 



W 



2 

35" 



13 



2 

w 



38 



W 



3 

"96" 



158 



3 



2876 



"ilf 
315" 



1922 



188 



10] 



1595 



69 



23 



36 






w 



3 



1U2 



Q 



l 

a 

M 

cc; jxj 

Ph R 
CO &4 



2306 



311 



880 



178 



58 



735 



72 

T 



9 
T 



77 



65^ 



81 



33 



73 



3 



1 



1 

T35" 



57 



Ji 



172 



22 



5 



3 






25 



139 



19 



h 



3 



20 



1 

IT 



32 



19 



5 



162 



T 



12 



13 



21 



5 



23 



12 



TG 




3367 



TH7H 



3 



3 



23 



221 
"~5o 



IIaD 



35 



22 



75 



17 



1 



Jl 



13 



173 



T5 
U 



W 



207 



22u 



206 



336 

TTcii' 



u33 



1,338 



276 
231 

1 



11 

2 



3 

II 



13 



159 
37 



5U8 
"TH" 



121 
103 



1,699 



ZK 

12T 

8 

llq 

313 



1 



EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 
Affidavit of Support "" 
Affidavit of Facts 



Certificate of Identity 

U.S.S.R. Exit Permit * 

Polish Assurance 
Other Notarial 



Cuban Adjustment (I-1+85A) "" 

Biographic Information(G325) 

(G325A) 
Labor Clearance (ES-575A and Bj 
Cuban Assurance 



OTHER SERVICES 

Change of Status (Cards) 
Appearance at Hearings 
Interpretation & Trans 

Letters ~" 

Other 



B 

Eh 
CO 
O 



k6& 



1820 



If 



7c" 



358 



1578 



299 



8ii20 



627 



U^TERVIEI-J ^(yCCMERS) 



TOTALS 



200_ 
iu29 



"cloT 



1771 



26,562 



erf 



l-H- „ 

Ptl erf 



U67 



88 



10 



120 



23; 



13 



565 



h6 



13 



5 
W 



676 



11,171 



i 



hh 1 Crf 



801. 



286 

~5F 



25 



137 



~6o" 



231 



1589 



82 



219 



1031 
2?f 



157 



7,021 



i 

erf ^ 

CO Cm 



207 



"9c" 



13 



erf. 
m 

Crf CO 
O W 
13 o 



568 



236 

"15" 



3 

"oT 



18 



359 



38 



7 

HIT 



330 



3,937 



10 

39" 



11 



178 



10 



tth 



38 



122 



387 



186 



5,606 



CO 



En 
O 

EH 



6,701 



2,526 



151 



1 
"61 



lii8 

"Bo? 
"SB 



2,238 
3lU 



17 



11,U87 



831 



220 



1,782 



310 



3,060 



JtL>297 



ALL OFFICES 


ETHNIC AND 


NATIONALITY STATISTICS 


WOR- 
CESTER 




7/1/67-6/30/68 


' BOSTON 


FALL 


LAW- 


SPRING- 
FIELD 






RIVER 


REKCE 


TOTAL 


1 • Albania 


57 


~ 




1 


120 


178 


2 • Algeria 


1 


- 


— 


mm 


4 

i 


■"" 


3 » Antigua 


30 


- 


- 


— 


— 


30 


k. Argentina 


272 


k 


U5 


7 


32_[ 


360 


5. Armenia (R. or T.) 


12 


— 


37 


2 


■1 1 m 

J, -.0 


lug 


6, Australia 


3k 


2 


7 


1 


■*i 


/.;o 


7 • Austria 


87 


10 


b 


12 


■ -"■ „ 


1 rs-S 


8 „ Bahamas 


39 


- 


— 


- 


r-» 




9. Barbados 


329 


mm 


- 


62 


- 1 ?- 


ns5 


10 . Belgium 


k9 


U 


9 


29 


£? 


fLo 


11 • Eermda 


21 


% 


— 


2 


. 5S 


#r 


12. Bolivia 


20 


1 


— 


- 


*■**» 


27 


13. Bras.il 


H7 


19 


aS 


2 


10 


156 


Ik* Br. Guiana 


33 


- 


8 


*^ 


3 


I£ 


15. Bulgaria 


20 


— 


- 


1 


U 


25 


16. Canada 


1952 


101 


1069 


U95 


50U 


^21 


17. Ceylon 


h 


— 


— 


- 


- 


u 


18. Chile 


U6 


1 


5 


. 


10 


62 


19. China 


792 


111* 


27 


30 


82 


1077 


20. Colombia 


350 


2 


17 


20 


96 


m 


21 • Congo 


— 


— 


3 


- 


- 


3 


22. Costa Rica 


301 


- 


20 


7 


5 


333 


23 . Cuba 


2552 


5 


1080 


97 


20it 


3938 


2U. Cyprus 


— 


- 


10 


— 


•■* 


10 


25. Czechoslovakia 


kS 




2 


29 


13 


89 


26. Danzig 


k 


— 


— 


- 


- 


k 


27 • Denmark 


20 


k 


18 


11 


5 


58 


2ti, Dominican Republic 


227 


— 


380 


2 


11 


620 


29. Ecuador 


205 


X 


137 


66 


3 


M3 


30. Egypt 


127 


11 


52" 


2 


17 


209 


31. El Salvador 


32 


— 


— 


•^ 


- 


32 


32 ♦ England 


^35 


a 


10U 


206 


132 


933 


33 • Estonia 


9 


— 


_ 


10 


1 


20 


3k* Finland 


U8 


m» 


— 


1 


33 


82 


35. Formosa 


12 


— 


— 


22 


- 


3k 


36. France 


17ii 


32 


136 


51 


79 


U72 


37. Germany 


520 


67 


21*5 


269 


205 


1306 


38. Ghana 


11 




*■* 


— 


3 


1U 


39. Greece 


1U78 


33 


7U9 


22U 


i U19 


I 2903 


kO . Guatemala 


330 


2 


28" 


1 


I 


365 


U1 . Haiti 


535 


, — 


20 


3 


k 


" 562 


U2 • Honduras 


U75 


— . 


6 


5 


h 


U90 


U3. Hong Kong 


26 


13 


8 


— 


9 


56 


kk* Hungary 


132 


6 


55 


2I4 


30 


2U7 


U5. Iceland 


- 


— 


~ 


— 


li 


k " 


I46 • India 


122 


15 


Ui 


26 


75 


282 


kl • Indonesia 


23 


_ 


19 


29 


11 


' 82 _ 


U8. Iran 


' 68 


— 


8 


2 


3 


81 


U9. Lraq_ 


15 


— 


9 


5 


3 


32 


50. Ireland 


13C0 


11 


ft 


1U1 


129 


" 1635 


51. Israel 


70 


— 


k 


9 


11 


9k 


52. Italy 


3196 


3^ 


9U8 


281 


922 


' 5382 





. 






SPRING- 
FIELD. - 


- WOR- 
CESTER 






BOSTON 


FALL LA¥- 
RIVER RENCE 


TOTAL 


1 

S3* Jamaica 1102 


„ 


5 


as 


U6 


1571 


5U. Japan 


75 


3 


9 


65 


22 


17U 


55 • Jordan 


■ 37 


- 


b 


26 


k 


75 


56 • Kenya 


15 


— 


— 


mm 


- 


"TT 


57 . Korea 


75 


5~ 


17 


k3 


32 


172 


58. Latvia 


127 


7 


5 


5 


12 


156 


5?. Lebanon 


12k 


8 


395 


32 


61 


620 


60, Liberia 


20 


— 


— 


- 


' 


20 


6l . Libya 


9 


- 


- 


- 


'■ ** 


9 


62 • Lithuania 


313 


k 


23 


7 


•89 


U36 


63. Macau 


6 


*. 


— 


■«* 


- 


6 


6/4.. Malaya 


1 


. — 


- 


— 


- 


1 


65. Malta 


7 


¥^ 


- 


- 




7 


66. Mexico 


177 


2 


13 


k 


Ik 


210 


07 , Montserrat 


255 


_ 




■ — 


- 


255 


68. Morocco 


Ui 


3 


23 


3 


1 


Ik 


69. Netherlands 


83 


it 


21 


lii 


hi 


179 


70. New Zealand 


12 


— 


2 




2 


16 


71 • Nicaragua 


56 


•■ 


— 


- 




56 


72. Norway 


k2 


61 


— 


2 


16 


125 


73. Other Countries 


118 


3 


— 


27 


15 


163 


Ik* Pakistan 


29 


*" 


IW 


1 


1F 


kk 


75 • Palestine 


2k 




U7 


11 


1 


83 


76 « Panama 


117 


10 


5 


21 


k 


157 


77. Paraguay 


9 


MM 


~ 


h 


- 


13 


78. Peru 


126 


— 


- 


19 


1 


1U6 


79. Philippines 


m 


89 


u 


26 


39 


i99 


80. Poland 


1308 


103 


288 


215 


558 


2U72 


81. Portugal 


1388 


2825 


2U3 


132 


37 


KS26 


82. Puerto Rico 


10 


HV 


2 


- 


1 


13 


83 • Rumania 


60 


6 


1 


11 


k3 


121 


81* , Scotland 


175 


2 


25 


UI 


I16 


289 


85. South Africa 


27 


tt 


M 


■ 2 


• 


33 


86, Spain 


1li0 


9 


17 


1b 


1b 


202 


87. St. Lucia 


19 


- 


- — '," 


1 


- 


20 


88. Sweden 


ko T 


a 


7 


15 


k3 


109 


89. Switzerland 


90 


- 


12 


a 


6 


112 


90. Syria 


105 


2 72 


15 


25 


219 


91 • Thailand 


32 j 


- 


1 


2 


1 


36 


92. Trinidad 


k62 


2 


MM 


TUT 


6 


hSTT 


93. Turkey 


27o" 




66 


19 


~8B~ 


""CU9 


9k* Ukraine 


U2 


-•"• 


■pri ■• 


6 


- j 


JU8 


9S* U.S.S.R. 


"23T" 


11 


19 


21 


ko 


326Sj 


96. United State's 


1623 


269 


292 


55T 


806 


3563 


* 97. Uruguay 


kk 


'_' ■■ 


- 




1 


k$ 


98 . Venezuela 


19 


7 


ft 




26 


i 66 


99* Vietnam 


7 


3 


5 


2 


k 


21 


100. Wales 


fh 


- 


5 


1 


5 


25 


101. West Indies (other) 


1U7 


1 


— 


18 


3 


169" 


102. Yugoslavia 


98 . 




- 


22 


32 


152 


TOTALS 


2656" 2 


- ijlTl 


7021 


3937 


5606 


U7,29y 





BOSTON 

- 6/30/68 
22 


FALL 
RIVER 

L C A : 


LAWRENCE 
, I T I E S 


I 

SPRING- 
FIELD WORCESTER 

A 


TOTAL 


Fiscal Year 7/1/67 
Abington 




wm 


11 Offices 
22 


Acton 


23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23 


Acushnet 


- 


13 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Adams 


1 


- 


— 


9 


" I 


10 


Agawam 


- 


— 


- 


73 




73 


Amesbury 


3 


— 


7 




- 


10 


Amherst 


1 


— 


- 


26 


— 


27 


Andover 


8 


— 


159 


- 


- 


167 


Arlington 


308 


— 


17 


- 


- 


325 


Ashfield 


- 


- 


0m% 


— 


6 


6 


Ashland 


k 


— 


~ 


— 


- 


k 


Athol 


- 


- 


mm 


1 


- 


1 


Attleboro 


50 


72 


— 


— 


- 


122 


Auburn 


- 


— 




— 


73 


73 


Avon 


8 


•M 


mm 




— 


8 


Ayer 


61 


3 


10 


2 


76 


Barnstable 


3h 


69 


2 


_ 


mm 


105 


Barre 


1 


— 


— 


- 


33 


' 3h 


Bedford 


52 i 


— 


3 


- 


- 


tt 


Belchertown 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


9 


Bellingham 


15 


— 


- 


- 


— 


15 


Belmont 


22ir 


— 


12 


— 


- 


"23H~ 


Beverly 


60 


- 


1 


- 


— 


61 


Bill erica 


29 


— 


10 


— 




39 


Blacks tone 


h 


— 


3 


- 


1 Bll 

- 


7 


Blandford 


- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


1 


Boston 


12,U97 


7 


122 


1 


13 


I2,61i0 


Bourne 


15 


19 


— 


— 


- 


3U 


B oxford 


- 


— 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Boylston 


- 


Urn 


— 


— 


7 


7 


Braintree 


57 




9-m 


- 


- 


57 


Brewster 


- 


3 


mm 


— 


- 


3 


Bridgewater 


2k 


11 - 




- 


- 


3b 


Brisifield 


- 


mm 


mm 


10 


- 


1- 


Brockton 


238 


31 


17 


M 


- 


288 


Brookfield 


- 


*" 




— 


29 


29 


Brookline 


1,023 


- 


10 


- 


- 


1 ,033 


Burlington 


W " 


- 


— 


- 


- 


U. 


Cambridge 


U7881 




6 




1 


'I 

1 ,795 


Canton 


78 


— 


— 


„ 


— 


"8 


Carlisle 


111 


- 


— 


— 


- 


'k 


Carver 


15 


- 


- 


— 


- 


'5 


Charlton 


m* 


— 


— 


— 


27 


27 


Chelmsford 


6 


— 


9h 


— 


— 


100 


Chelsea 


310 


- 


1 


— 


- 


311 



Chester 


BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWREKCE 


SPRING- 
. FIELD 

5 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 

5 


Chicopee 


16 


- 


- 


544 


~ 


560 


Clarksburg 


- 


- 


— 


3 


- 


3 


Clinton 


- 


- 


- 


m 


115 


115 


Cohasset 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Concord 


57 


■» 


1 


- 


m 


5a 


Dal ton 


1 






3 


-— 


U 


Danvers 


17 


~ 


30 


■tf 


- 


47 


Dartmouth 


14 


99 


— 


- 


- 


113 


Dedham 


123 


— 


2 


- 


- 


125 


Deer field 


2 


- 


- 


2 


— 


4 


Dennis 


— 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Dighton 


m. 


tl 


- 


- 


- 


It 


Dracut 


- 


— 


66 


- 


— 


66 


Dudley 


5 


- 


- 


- 


75 


80 


©unstable 


- 


'» 


i 


- 


- 


1 


Duxbury 


10 


— 


- 


- 


- 


10 


East Bridgewater 


59 


. 




. , 


mm 


59 


East Longmeadow 


- 


- 


- 


26 


- 


26^' 


Easthampton 


10 


- 


1 


11 


- 


22 


Easton 


15 


- 


- 


- 


«• 


15 


Essex 


h 


- 




.. 


- 


k 


Everett 


398 


- 


3 


- 


3 


404 


Fair haven 


10 


132 




tm 


„. 


1li2 


Fall River 


37 


2,019 


- 


*« 


- 


2,056 


Falmouth 


36 


— 


- 


- 


- 


36 


Fitchburg 


iti 


- 


- 


cm 


63 


81" 


Florida 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Foxborough 


11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Framingham 


iai 


- 


2 


- 


13 


196 


Franklin 


U2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


42 


Freetown 


- 


h 


— 


- 


- 


h 


Gardner 


22 


M 


M 




61 


83 


<>©orgetown 


10 


- 


> 


h 


- 


ia 


Gloucester 


176 


- 


3 


- 


- 


179 


Grafton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


91 


91 


Grahby 


- 


•» 


— 


11* 


- 


111 


Great Barrington 


I* 


- 


«• 


1 


•s 


T~ 


Greenfield 


26 


- 


- 


6 


p~ 


32 


Groton 


2 


- 


7 


- 


— 


9 


Groveland 


19 


- 


1 


- 


•> 


20 


Hadley 


mm 


^ 


. 


7 


mm 


7 


Halifax 


13 


- 


- 


H 


- 


13 


Hamilton 


T" 


- 


- 


- 


tHft 


4 


Hampden 


- 


- 


■M 


5 , 


- 


"T 



TOTAL 




Hanover 

Hanson_ 

Hardwiek 

Han-rich 

Hatfield^ 

Haverhill 

Hingham_ 

Holbrook 

Holden_ 

Holliston 

Holyoke 

Hopedale 

Hopkinton_ 

Hubbardston 

Hudson 

Hull_ 

Huntington 

Ipswich 

Kingston 

Lakeville 
Lancaster 
Laxirrence 

Lee 

Leicester 

Lenox^_ 

Leominster 

Lexington 

Lincoln^ 

Littleton_ 

Longmeadow 

Lowell 

Ludlow 

Lynn 

Lynnfield 

Malden_ 

Manchester 

Mansfield^ 

Marblehead 

Karion^ 

Marlborough 

Marshf ield 

Mashpee 

Mattapoisett 

Maynard 

Medfield 

Medford 

Medway 



Melrose 


BOSTON 

16 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAURENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
U5 


Iierriinac 


- 


-^. 


18 


~* 


— 


18 


Methuen 


9 


— 


387 


- i 


— 


396 


Hiddleborough 


18 


36 


3 


s 


— 


57 


Mddleton 


1 




3 




— 


k 


Milford 


22 


— 


- 


"* 


111 


133 


Millbury 


— 


- 


— 




59 


59 


Millie 


3 




— 


— 


— 


3 


Milton 


U2 


— 


— 


~ 


— 


U2 


Monson 


— 


— 


— 


12 


— 


12 


Montague 


2 


- 


— 


1 


— 


3 


Nahant 


6 




_ 






6 


Nantucket 


1 


3 


— 


— 


— 


U 


Natick 


1li0 


- 


h 


— 


1 


115 


Needham 


71 




2 


— 




73 


New Bedford 


~?3 


1,211 


- 


— 


— 


1.261* 


New Braintree 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 






— 


— 


7 


— 


7 


Nex-rburyport 


- 


— 


3 


~ 


— 


3 


Newton 


%2 


— 


2 


— 


1 


965 


Norfolk 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


North Adams 


20 


— 


- 


8 


1 


29 


North Andover 


— 


— 


155 


— 


— 


155 


North Attleborough 


10 


2 


— 


— 


— 


12 


North Brookfield 


- 


— 


— 


— 


12 


12 


North Reading 


26 


— 


— 


— 


- 


26 


Northampton 


3 


— 


- 


S3 


1 


57 


Northborough 


T 


— 


3 


— 


92 


99 


Northbridge 


- 


- 


1 


— 


26 


27 


Norton 


12 


6 


~ 


— 


— 


18 


Norwell 


"T 


— 


- 


— 


— 


5 


Nonfood 


119 


— 


• 


— 


— 


119 


Orange 


9 


— 


** 




2 


11 


Orleans 


h 


— 


— 


— 


- 


* 


Otis 


4 

I 


— 


— 


— 




j 1 


Oxford 


- 


- 


— 


— 


28 


28 


Palmer 


h 






23 




27 


Paxton 


1 


— 


— 




3h 


S- 


Peabody__ 


335 




3k 


— 


— 


369 


Pembroke 


3 


— 


- 


— 


- 


3 


Pepperell 


— 


— 


12 


— 


- 


12 


Phillipston 


22 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


22 


Pittsfield 


32 


— 


2 


13 


— 


U7 


Plainville 


8 


— 


— 


— 


■to 


8 


Plymouth 


19 


— 


— 


— 


— 


19 


Princeton 


- 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


Provincetown 


1 




— 


— 


— 


1 


Quincy 


201; 




7 


_ 


_ 


211 



BOSTON 
Randolph 61 


FALL 

RIVER 


LATJRENCE 
2 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
63 


Raynham "TJ 


k 


- 




— 


8 


Reading jj 


- 


- 




s» 


h it 


Rehoboth - 


1 


- 


„ 


- 


1 


Revere 113 


- 


2 


- 


— 


115 


Rochester - 


3 


- 


- 


— 


3 


Rockland So 


3 


- 


- 


— 


63 


Rowley 22 


— 


— 


- 


— 


22 


Royals ton - - 


MB 


T 


. - 


T 


Rutland 


- 


- 


- 


32 


32 


Salem 92 




1 






93 


Salisbury 


— 


1 


— 


- 


1 


Sandisfield 


— 


— 


6 


— 


6"" 


Saugus 89 


— 


— 


— 


— 


b9 


Scituate 1 30 


— 


-. 


— 


«* 


130 


Seekonk 3 


lit 


— 


— 


- 


17 


Sharon 21 


— 


3 


■■ 


— 


2it 


Sheffield I" 


— 


- 


19 


- 


19 


Sherborn I4. 


— 


— 


-. 


— 


k 


Shirley 1 


— 


— 


— 


- 


1 


Shrewsbury 


— 


— 


- 


187 


187 


Somerset 


106 


1 


Cat 




107 


Somerville 91 1 


— 


- 


- 


1 


912 


South Hadley 


— 


— 


50 




50 


Southborough 3 


— 


= 


- 


6 


9 


Southbridge 


— 


- 


- 


litl 


litl 


Southwick 


~ 


— 


6 


— 


6 


Spencer 5 


— 


— 


- 


hi 


U8 


Springfield 23 


<— 


- 


1,996 


— 


2,019 


Stockbridge 3 




- 


1 


~ 


it 


Stoneham 1 02 


— 


— 


Mi 


— 


102 


Stoughton '69 


12 


— 


— 


— 


81 


Stow 1 1 


— 


— 


— 


- 


11 


Sturbridge 


— 


— 


it 


27 


31 


Sudbury 1 9 


BS 


M 


— 


2 


21 


Sutton 


— 


— 


— 


7 


7 


Swamps cott 77 


— 


— 


— 


— 


77 


Swansea - 


72 


— 


- 


— 


72 


Taunton 52 


111 


5 




1 


169 


Templeton 1 


- 


— 


— 


1 


2 


Tewksbury 1 1 


- 


53 


— 


— 


6U 


Tisbury 1 


- 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Topsfield 32 


— 


7 


— 


— 


39 


Towns end 


— 


a 


- 


1 


1 


Truro 2 


— 


■1 


— 


— 


2 


Tyngsborough 


~ 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Upton 




. 


£• 


21 


21 


Uxbridge 


- 


- 


- 


36 


36 



Wakefield 


BOSTON 
U8 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 
12 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
60 


Walpole 


62 


— 


h 


— 


— 


66 


Walthain 


h'3h 


- 


5 




- 


k39 


Ware 


— 


- 


- 


6 


23 


29 


Wareham 


5 1 


u 


— 


mm 


- 


9 


Water town 


506 


- 


— 


*» 


1 


509 


Wayland 


20 




- 


tmt 


2 


22 


Webster 


2 


- 


— 


« 


171 


173 


Wellesley 


109 




— 


— 


— 


109 


Wellfleet 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Wenham 


h 


— 


— 


— 


- 


k 


West Boylston 


-. 


mm 


— 


- 


56 


56 


VJest Bridgeuater 


6 


— 


— 


— 


- 


6 


West Brookfield 


- 


— 


— 


2 


9 


11 


West Springfield 


1 


— 


— 


131 


- 


132 


Wes thorough 


17 


— 


_ 


— 


56 


73 


Westfield 


- 


— 


• 


11*7 


- 


1U7 


Westford 


2 


— 


h 


— 


— 


6 


Westminster 


6 


— 


mm 


— 


- 


6 


Weston 


35 


— 




— 


1 


" 36" 




- 


U8 


— 


— 


- 


hQ 


Westwood 


U2 


— 


6 


— 


mS 


U8 


Weymouth 


105 


«• 





— 


- 


105 


Whitrian 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Wilbraham 


- 


— 


— 


1*9 


— 


U9 


Williamsburg 


- 


- 





1 


— 


1 


Williamstown 


- 


« 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Wilmington 


37 


— 


6 


— 


- 


U3 


Winchendon 


1 


m 


. 


— 


- 


1 


Winchester 


78 


— 


6 


— 


m 


8U 


Winthrop 


6Ii 


— 


m. 


— 


- 


6U 


Woburn 


153 


— 


8 


— 


- 


161 


Worcester 


51 


— 


7 


«■* 


3,373 


3,U31 


Wrentham 


57 


«. 




— 


- 


57 


Yarmouth 


1 








_, 


1 


Cut of State 


h77 




167 


63 


10 


717 


TOTAL 


26,562 


U.171 


7,021 , 


3,937 


i,606 


U7,297 









■ 






. 




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